Tuesday, November 6, 2007

Mythologyze?

To date, what important conclusions can you draw about the myths you have read and the divinity/mortal behaviors you have witnessed. Explain, detail, and justify.

26 comments:

mikee said...

Most myths seem to have a different mystical element about them and the mortals in them always have something that either puts them above or below the rest. For example, Perseus must have been liked by multiple divinities otherwise they would not have helped him. Another example is Theseus, were he not the sun of a king, he would most likely not have been the hero he was due to the fact that he would never have been sent to Athens. I views the divinities in these myths as very moody. They only help those they like, and when they are working against those they don't. Athena helps Perseus to kill Medusa because she is to prideful. These are not the only examples of said identifications, but they are proof enough.

JamesE. said...

The divinities seem to help certain mortals with a good objective. The journeys that seem to hard and almost impossible but done with a good cause, they are the ones that are rewarded by the gods. The gods i suppose like to be recognized for something, such as helping someone for a great cause so they can be remembered. If you stay on course with with good on mind than you may recieve some help on your quest. They say nothing about how the gods help assist evil and doing bad stuff. It's all about how will you be remembered.

LHorner said...

As we have seen so far in the majority of myths read in class, the ancient Greeks seemed to strive for excellence. No matter what myth it is, be it Theseus, Perseus, or Jason, each mortal (regardless of whether or not he receives divine assistance) desires greatness, to complete difficult tasks, and be remembered even after death.

ccooper said...

As we have read all the myth's in class I have noticed that they all strive for excellence and to be successful. They want to be excellent at what they do . In every story we have read I noticed that all of them want to be so great and so powerful

Michael G. said...

You can draw many conclusions from all these various myths we have read. First off, all these myths seem to be about divinities helping out the guy with a "good" cause. I agree with Jamese when he states, " If you stay on course with the good in mind you may recieve help on your quest". And this is a very thematic element in all the myths we read. If you have a good cause the divinties will be up for the challenge with you.

Mr. Craigo said...

I noticed between the myths we have read that many of them are very similar. for examples, Jason and Perseus and Theseus are very alike in the way they handle there myths. Like each one has help from the gods. Also in almost every myth we have read this year it seems to me that all the divinities and people in the myths are very successful and complete what they are out for. Another thing I have noticed is that between the myths they don’t talk about other myths within there myth. Those are just a couple of things I have noticed so far in this semester.

Mike said...

The myths that we have read in class are for mortals, for a short period of time, but mostly in favor of the Gods. Every time a God enters a story it is a major turning point or just another step in the right direction. The Gods never stop being Godly but after the quest is done the mortal always succumbs to their flaws and can never recover from them. The Gods always stay high and the mortals always end up low.

Mumblo said...

Ive noticed that the majority of the myths we read remind me of stories ive already read such as robin hood. This is probably because most epic stories have the same types of common elements. The hero in all the stories are all striving to overcome some evil usually with the help of mortals or divinities.Also the heros in the myths all have exesive pride in their skills.

dustinf said...

After reading many different myths I have learned alot. Greek myths appear to be about mortals and the divinities come in to teach a lesson or just to mess with the humans. Each myth starts out really as normal human life untill the divinities get involved. Some of the time they teach a very important lesson or explain a concept beyond their grasp. I also think some myths are just for entertainment. No matter what the myths try to accomplish or what they are about they all seem to have the basic mortal behaviors with the gods coming in and interfering with everyday life.

paulk said...

The mortals in all of the stories that we have read act in ways that are natural for humans. Some times they are rewarded by the divinities and some times punished. The good are often rewarded but it is not uncommon for the gods to punish them. It seems that the gods are an explanation for the random events that occur. They are invented by the Greeks to explain in a way that they can understand why good does always win but should always be attempted.

adams said...

The myth seem to mostly identify with the gods love for humans. Even though the gods are generally immoral creatures it is the gods that for some reason are always helping the humans accomplish their task. The gods are constantly watching out for the heroes in these myths. This is somewhat contradictory to their behavior, however. Why the gods would even care at all about what the humans accomplish is a question that must be pondered, after all what is it that the gods gain from mortal success. The mortals seem to be slightly self centered, for the most part in these stories. They have large ego's. This only further makes one wonder why it is that the gods would help the humans. Perhaps it is simply because the gods and the mortals are similiar in their behaviors. I agree with james also when he stated that perhaps the gods would like to be recognized for something just as humans like to be recognized for their achievements.

afoyle said...

An important conclusion I believe can be drawn from these myths is that, god or man, everyone values pride, glory, and justice and does not enjoy has their honor infringed upon. Zeus, for example, enjoys his title of "king of the gods", but when Otus and Ephialtes try to overthrow him, Zeus would have destroyed them were it not for Poseidon. When a goddess is rivaled by a mortal who proclaims their superiority, the goddess' honor is at stake (i.e. Arachne, Medusa, Psyche, etc). Finally, the god's are quicker to punish then they are to praise. Hera has truly helped only one person, the rest she spites or ignores; Zeus is ever ready to strike any down with his thunderbolts; and, especially, Artemis, who had only one male follower (and he died) and kills all other males who disrespect her or her sacred animal.

alex b said...

In almost every myth we've read the hero is someone that is not very important in there own society, but are given an important quest. Also the gods usually give the hero help in one way or another. The hero is always on a quest to prove their worth in some form so the gods must feel they're worthy in order to give them their help.

nathank2 said...

I think that I have realized that regardless of how absurd something may seem, it gives insight into the culture that created it. As a society we need to put less importance on factual information and start realizing the importance of creativity and thought. Greek mythology has opened my eyes to another world.

alliem said...

So far one of the most obvious conclusions I have noticed is that each and every god shows not one but many human-like characteristics. For example in many of the earlier myths we read,Zeus shows several incidents of lust and infidelity with random mortal women. In response Hera shows enormous jealousy and often takes unjust revenge. When you imagine a god you usually think of perfection, but in Greek myths the Gods are quite the opposite and show many very human tendencies.

Kylek said...

Within all of the myths we have read the hero or the divinity completes tasks for personal gain. I find it interesting how the ancient Greeks thought that having help from divinities made a hero more divine when in essence, both hero and divinity are striving for self gain.

Mythlovin said...

Something I pondered is how the Greeks came to develope these myths. Its like the Greeks saw that our "superiority" is dependant on the gods' "subperiority," although the gods may find them and us necesary to eachother. It is as if the gods', who are supposed to be supreme beings, righteousness is diluted and their quality weakened by their contradictory actions. It seems as if even the gods are sinning. But how could corruptness help us humans? Perhaps they show us what is wrong, for we would not know what is right if there is no wrong. This gives us choice, which is what, I adduce, separates us from the gods; good god or bad. A good god knows only how to do good and vice versa. Just like in the old Testament and the description of the angels. It seems that the gods lack choice. It seems that superiority and subperiority is determined by our choices. As if we are not superior by choice alone but by righteous choice. I believe this is how the gods really help us. I think the Greeks were looking at a bigger picture.

Aaron B said...

After reading many myths I have witnessed many things that the divinities do. One thing that agitates me about the divinities of how much they are like humans in personality. When I usually think of a god or goddess I think of doing whats right, but in Greek Zeus the god of all Gods is sneaking behind his wifes back with a mistress almost every night.

mckenna said...

All the myths attempt to explain something about life. Whether it's human nature, morals, or the answers to theological questions, they all strive to find explanations to justify occurences in the world. Also, the divinities we have read about obviously have many humanistic qualities and imperfections. This makes them easier to relate to, but also harder to get along with. They are very tempermental though, always getting upset at small trifilous things. You'd think that if you were going to live forever you would find something better to do with your time... Hera is always jealous and spiteful. Aphroditie is extremely conceited. Zeus has an incredibly short temper... In a way it makes people seem a bit better than them, because they don't or can't excercise self-restraint and control.

scheibes3 said...

I think that most myths that we hace read in class are their for a purpose and that purpose is pleasure. They are also used to throw your problems on. But i enjoy reading them. They are great stories and can really keep you alive while reading them. But as for the greeks i think that they almost used them in the same way. To get away from life, and i think it actually worked for them.

Snyder#5 said...

I think that on average the myths read to date all show an extreme connection between the behaviors of mortals and divinties. The anthrapamorphic qualities given by the scribe I beleive help the reader to have a a better connection and thus a better understanding of the ideas that the writer is trying to bring about. People generally have an easier time reading pieces of literature if they are able to place themslves in the situation or see themselves being involved in a sort of situation as one that is being described.

Snyder#5 said...

I think that on average the myths read to date all show an extreme connection between the behaviors of mortals and divinties. The anthrapamorphic qualities given by the scribe I beleive help the reader to have a a better connection and thus a better understanding of the ideas that the writer is trying to bring about. People generally have an easier time reading pieces of literature if they are able to place themslves in the situation or see themselves being involved in a sort of situation as one that is being described.

Snyder#5 said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Kenna Mullins said...

Among the myths we've read and studied throughout the semester, I've noticed that many of them have similar qualities. There is also a hero on a mission or journey, trying to do something to save someone else. The mortal who is going on this "journey" is usually on good terms with a god or multiple gods. It has also been a common theme for the mortal hero to make a mistake along their journey and be punished for it in one way or another.

Kenna Mullins said...

Among the myths we've read and studied throughout the semester, I've noticed that many of them have similar qualities. There is also a hero on a mission or journey, trying to do something to save someone else. The mortal who is going on this "journey" is usually on good terms with a god or multiple gods. It has also been a common theme for the mortal hero to make a mistake along their journey and be punished for it in one way or another.

TomB said...

the divinities seem to be what humans see as the best example of their most base emotions. Pride, Wrath, Love, all human feelings and qualities have a divinity tied to them. so many stories are told through the gods and heroes as examples of what you should do in response to another gods machinations (What Would Jupiter Do?)they are divine, but not in the sense that they are flawless. they have human flaws.